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Wednesday 2, August

Berlin Lion: The psychological phenomenon behind the big cat sightings

How Berlin, and the world, became captivated by the hunt for one seriously elusive lion.

Photo: IMAGO / dts Nachrichtenagentur

Berlin Lion: The psychological phenomenon behind the big cat sightings

Wednesday 2, August

It’s been 2 weeks since Berlin experienced a rollercoaster ride of a news story. Reports of a lion sighting sent police and residents on a wild goose chase, only to uncover the unsurprising truth — the big cat was in fact a wild boar.

🐗 Berlin lion update: It was a wild boar

The captivating events unfolded over two suspenseful days, drawing hundreds of armed officers, veterinarians and hunters to the scene. The news went global too, with news outlets across Europe reporting on the incident. But what led people to believe the hype?

Enter the “Mandela Effect,” a psychological phenomenon where false memories take on a life of their own, affecting even large groups. Scientific experiments have convincingly demonstrated how our minds can be manipulated into vividly imagining events that never happened. The more people embrace these fabricated ideas, the stronger the Mandela Effect’s grip. In the wake of extensive media coverage, the collective consciousness latched onto the lion tale, perpetuating the illusion.

🦁 Lion hysteria: We examine the evidence

The phenomenon of unusual sightings is of course not new. Famous examples include the elusive Bigfoot in the USA or the Loch Ness Monster in Scotland, with legends having been widely cited. While the lid has officially been blown off this Berlin mystery, many are left wondering how such a wild theory could have taken hold.